Grant

Council of State Governments

$0 Illinois
EnvironmentGreat Lakes

Since 2003, the Council of State Governments Midwestern Office (CSG Midwest) has brought together state and provincial legislators from the Great Lakes region to learn about key issues affecting the lakes, exchange information and ideas, and build their capacity to be effective advocates for and stewards of the lakes. The forum for our work is the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Legislative Caucus (GLLC), founded in 2003 by the late Michigan Senator Patricia Birkholz. Today, with over 200 enrolled members representing eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, the Caucus stands as the only binational, nonpartisan organization dedicated solely to educating and engaging state and provincial legislators on issues related to restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. Founded in 1933, CSG is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to excellence in state government. Through its national and regional offices and its network of affiliated organizations, CSG provides a variety of services to the states, including leadership training, educational programs, research, consulting, and information services. CSG Midwest provides staff support and secretariat services to several regional groups of state officials, including the GLLC. Our two principal objectives in working with the GLLC are to educate legislators and engage them in crafting multijurisdictional solutions to common problems related to water quality in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region. The Caucus is organized around the guiding principle of assuring that the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River continue to provide a plentiful source of clean, affordable water to the region’s residents, businesses, and industries. It is the only Great Lakes organization whose members have the ability to enact laws and appropriate funding at the state and provincial level. It is therefore extremely important that legislators be knowledgeable about the issues that affect the Great Lakes and also the opportunities to address these problems through coordinated state and provincial action. In 2020-2022, we propose to continue our traditional activities including the GLLC annual meetings and quarterly web meetings. In addition to educating the region’s legislators about the issues on the GLLC’s policy agenda, these activities present opportunities for members to engage with the organization and build strong working relationships with their colleagues from around the region, thereby laying the groundwork for collaboration. We also propose to continue a new core activity for the Caucus – namely, the Patricia Birkholz Institute for Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Policy. The biennial Birkholz Institute is an intensive learning experience that takes a small group of GLLC members on a “deep dive” into a single issue on the GLLC’s policy agenda and prepares those legislators to lead the organization’s work to coordinate on regional solutions. In addition to organizing educational events for GLLC members and other legislators, we will facilitate the activities of the GLLC’s committees and task forces and will use written products, social media, and a new website to share information on the GLLC and its activities. CSG Midwest and the GLLC leaders and members greatly appreciate the support the Joyce Foundation has provided the Caucus over the years. Continued support will make it possible for CSG Midwest to conduct the GLLC’s core activities and to extend the work begun in 2018 and 2019 to collaborate regionally on solutions to the problems of lead in drinking water and nutrient pollution that affects the region’s waterbodies, most significantly Lake Erie. We are requesting $150,000 in grant funding for a two-year period from May 1, 2020, through April 30, 2022, to help us work with state and provincial legislators to collaborate on water policies, programs, and funding to ensure access to clean, affordable water and to promote the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes.

2020 [24]

Grant

West Point Fellowship Inc.

$0 Illinois
CultureArts Access and Participation

The West Point School of Music (WPSOM) respectfully requests a two-year grant of $70,000 to support its performance arm, Epic Steel Orchestra, an orchestra made up of and led by African Americans with a home base on Chicago’s underserved South Side. This request falls within The Joyce Foundation’s program priority of Community-Based Arts. The overarching goal is to establish Epic Steel Orchestra as one of the premiere cultural music ensembles emanating from the City of Chicago – and specifically, the South Side of Chicago. WPSOM has a dual purpose: 1) to provide music education to underserved, urban youth that culminates in performances, and 2) to make high quality culturally diverse performance of music accessible to all. Our methodology entails advancing our youth students into the Orchestra when they are ready to perform professionally. These purposes advance The Joyce Foundation’s goal to help cultural organizations ensure a diversity of perspective and experience, and to develop and offer creative programming for youth living in communities of color with little access to the arts. Unique to our pedagogy is the central place of the steel drum. The steel drum, invented in Trinidad and Tobago, evolved out of earlier musical practices of Trinidad’s enslaved Africans and Afro-descendants who had to make do with discarded materials for constructing musical instruments. Today, steel pan performance is a widely accepted art form and an international phenomenon, with steel pan orchestras springing up in Great Britain, Canada, and various European and Asian countries. It is WPSOM’s vision to birth in the City of Chicago a 100-voice steel pan orchestra with players drawn from disadvantaged and under-resourced Chicago neighborhoods. This vision is unfolding in Epic Steel Orchestra. Epic Steel, comprised of 15 skilled and versatile musicians, bring an educated, authentic, and mature sound to their music-making and are an asset to the musical landscape of Chicago. Epic Steel performed as part of the Chicago Park District’s “Night Out in the Parks” at four venues to a combined audience of over 3,000. The ensemble was also a part of a career in arts day at the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center where it performed three one-hour shows to 60 detained youth. In 2019, the orchestra performed at the Lyric Opera House (650 in attendance), the National Council on Family Philanthropy annual meeting (500 in attendance), and the Joyce Foundation's annual board meeting. Yet with all of these successes, it takes time to build an ensemble into a revenue-generating business that can pay its musicians a wage. Therefore, in the meantime, WPSOM is respectfully requesting a two-year grant of $70,000 to support the Epic Steel Orchestra to cover musician stipends and other expenses of the ensemble. WPSOM formalized its operations in 2011, yet its organizational priorities were the focus of its founder, Julian J. Champion, for seven years before the organization’s birth. He launched WPSOM to operationalize his vision of offering disadvantaged youth in Chicago music education and performance opportunities. It specifically focuses on underserved Chicago neighborhoods for musical performances. Epic Steel Orchestra, located in the South Shore neighborhood, serves communities throughout the City of Chicago; orchestra members call North Lawndale, South Shore and Maple Park communities their home.  WPSOM is led by a qualified and experienced Board of Directors that oversees its operations, business development, goals, and partnerships. The Board has developed a budget that reflects the needs of a growing organization that includes balanced and vetted revenue streams, staff expansion, and liability coverage. By investing in Epic Steel, The Joyce Foundation will increase the capacity and resources of a culturally specific and community-based arts organization.

2020 [12]

Grant

Illinois Arts Alliance

$0 Illinois
CultureArts Access and Participation

The Alliance respectfully requests $100,000 each year for three years to support the following work: Chicago’s Cultural Policy Evolution - Community Engagement Process The Alliance will partner with the City of Chicago in year 1 of the grant to get feedback from the creative sector on the mayor’s cultural policy agenda and programs, then recommend priorities based on the needs of the field and a focus on equitable access to a creative life for all of Chicago. The Alliance will present these priorities and hold a town hall meeting with the mayor to foster discussion with the creative community. In years 2 and 3, the Alliance will keep the administration accountable to sector needs and to the Joyce-supported Cultural Bill of Rights, through ongoing feedback once policy is prioritized and then implemented. This will include focus group discussions and continued dialogue with the mayor and DCASE, among other strategies. Building Public Will - Reimagining Arts Advocacy 101- The Power of Storytelling Advocacy 101 empowers and equips artists and creative organizations to work for systems and policy change, and better share their own story of value to make their case to a wide variety of stakeholders. The Alliance has long delivered advocacy training, but we aim to transform our process through substantive artist engagement and an immersive creative experience for participants, including hands-on exercises, tailored tools, research, and resources. We develop the workshop year 1, then implement it as an ongoing resource for years 2-3 and beyond. Building on “Artist as Problem Solver”: One State and Arts Move Policy (AMP) Series The Alliance will build on Joyce’s “Artist as Problem Solver” convenings, through our ongoing AMP series and a thread within the 2020 One State arts conference. These programs will focus on the intersections between the arts and civic and social issues – how creatives are making a difference across Illinois communities and how the creative community can get further involved. The One State conference will take place in 2020 and 2022 and we anticipate a minimum of 4 AMP Series events each year.  Planning and Pilot of Chicago Creative Network The Chicago Creative Network will be a cohort of ward-level representatives in Chicago that create a city-wide network of advocates for the creative sector. The network representatives will be natural leaders within arts communities who serve as rallying organizers for Alliance advocacy efforts, are knowledgeable about creatives, cultural programs, and assets in their community, represent the arts to aldermen and other public officials, and who serve as the go-to point of contact when local arts leaders have questions about policy, advocacy, or how to work with their local government. Year 1 will be planning and preliminary engagement of network members, and years 2 and 3 will be a pilot launch in 7-10 Chicago wards. Re-granting fund for “Arts + Stronger Communities” - planning The Alliance will plan, and seek funds, for this re-granting program to support specific projects that demonstrate the intersections between the arts and other civic and social issues. NEXTwork – The IL Creative ALAANA Leadership Network Championed by leaders of color across the creative sector supporting individual ALAANA culture workers (including the ALCN), the NEXTwork will help ALAANA professionals stay connected to each other and the field through professional development and career opportunities, mentorship/peer coaching, and affinity groups. The NEXTwork will also support and connect the individual projects of these arts leaders and connect them to an advocacy agenda. Already in planning stages, we anticipate the NEXTwork to be in pilot and implementation during the grant period.

2020 [12]

Grant

Chicago Community Foundation

$0 Illinois
Special OpportunitiesPublic Engagement

The Fund for Safe and Peaceful Communities (Fund) is one of four strategies of the Partnership for Safe and Peaceful Communities, a coalition of more than 45 funders committed to aligning their grantmaking to support proven and promising approaches to reducing gun violence. Other strategies include: 1) increasing police legitimacy through enhanced training, support for community engagement in police reform, and improved police-community relations; 2) reducing the availability of illegal guns; and 3) providing direct services to people who are most at risk of shooting and/or being shot through street outreach, cognitive behavioral therapy, and transitional jobs. Request: Support is requested for the Fund, which provides rapid response grants, ranging from $1,000 to $10,000, to support community-based activities that make Chicago neighborhoods safer, reduce violence, and promote peace throughout the summer and early fall. Organizations with budgets less than $500,000 are eligible to submit a short proposal in March that is reviewed by an advisory committee comprised of foundation representatives. Grant funds will be available in April within a week of approval. The Fund is a group advised fund that is administered by the Chicago Community Foundation (CCF), which accepts proposals and final reports and distributes grants.  The fundraising goal for 2020 is $1 million. Contributions should be made payable to CCF. Population Served: Residents of 21 communities on the south and west sides of the city that were prioritized for support based on homicide data compiled by the University of Chicago Crime Lab. Annual evaluations of the Chicago Fund have concluded that the activities supported help create the social cohesion that is necessary for violence prevention and reduction. They established a sense of community, strengthened relationships and trust among neighbors and with police, promoted inter-generational interactions, and provided safe spaces and pro-social activities for children and youth. They also helped inform community residents about available resources and programs. Moreover, grantees found value in networking with each other and forged new relationships. Another significant outcome was that the overwhelming response to the Fund has changed the narrative that communities of color are apathetic or hopeless about the violence plaguing their neighborhoods. The Fund unearthed myriad activities in which people were engaged or wanted to engage to make their communities safer places to live, work and play. Research by a New York University sociologist found that block-level, community-based activities are an underappreciated, but significant factor in crime reduction. The causes of violence are multi-faceted. Therefore solutions need to be as well. This type of funding, which supports the ideas of the people most impacted by violence, is a worthy complement to the police reform, gun policy, and direct service strategies of the Partnership for Safe and Peaceful Communities.

2020 [20]

Grant

Stand for Children Leadership Center - Indiana

$0 Indiana
Education & Economic MobilityEducator Quality

Over the next year, Stand Indiana will be leading education advocacy work in three core areas of interest to the Joyce Foundation: 1) educator quality, 2) principal leadership and 3) career and college readiness as it relates to freshman on-track. To support the scope of work outlined in this letter of intent, Stand Indiana respectfully requests a grant from the Joyce Foundation for $150,000. We continue to see challenges with schools being unable to recruit minority teachers, keeping high-quality teachers in the classroom and a trend of high-poverty schools having a much higher rate of low-performing teachers and disruptive staff turnover. Though there was movement in improving teacher preparation programs and elevating the profession during our previous grant cycle, we continue see ample evidence that the teaching profession itself needs a boost to attract and retain top talent. For this reason, the scope of this project will continue the advocacy necessary to elevate the teaching profession.  Specifically, we will build on our previous efforts supported by Joyce, which resulted in the first-ever state investments in career ladders and teacher residency, by: ·         Working with the governor’s teacher pay commission over the next several months to ensure their recommendations next summer call for a substantial boost in teacher pay (north of $300 million). We want to see this investment targeted at bolstering teacher career ladders across the state, rather than a recommendation for across-the-board pay hikes.   ·         Engaging and educating key lawmakers leading up to the 2021 budget session about the importance of investing more state funding to incent the creation of teacher career ladders, significantly boosting teacher pay across the state, improving teacher preparation and holding institutions of higher education accountable for turning out educators who are ready to lead classrooms. To help guide our recommendations on improving teacher preparation, we will study the approach Rhode Island is taking with teacher licensure, which according to NCTQ, has been effective in improving preparation in that state. The final state-wide policy initiative will focus on high school success through improvements to our accountability system.  Our goal is to ensure that freshman on-track metrics – in line with the evidence-based practices touted by the University of Chicago – are a formal part of the new accountability system by the 2020-2021 year. When it comes to our mission-focused work specifically in IPS, we have a goal of advocating for an improved strategy to bolster the principal talent pipeline in the district. Our plan is to collaborate with district administration to advocate for a formal partnership that engages experts in the field of principal leadership, such as TNTP or New Leaders. The goal is to have this principal leadership partnership in place by 2021.  

2020 [12]

Grant

WAVE Educational Fund

$0 Wisconsin
Gun Violence Prevention & Justice ReformGun Violence Prevention

As gun violence continues to ravage families and communities, all across our state and country, it can be difficult to perceive progress. Only by stepping back and taking a broader view can we fully appreciate that an essential cultural shift – one that serves as a precursor to much-needed changes in policy and practices – began several years ago and is accelerating in real time. The massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School ignited an inextinguishable passion, while the tragedy at Parkland gave that passion clarity of purpose. Across generations, across races, across the full geopolitical landscape of our country, citizens are now bringing their fierce and relentless determination to rallies and protests, to board rooms, to social media sites, to town hall meetings and, notably, to the polling booths. Citizens are leading a cultural revolution that is compelling corporate, local, state and national “leaders” to follow in their wake.   Changes we see in everything from corporate policy to candidates’ stated positions indicate that, clearly, we are on the brink of a monumental shift. Yet, the path forward is not without obstacles. Leaders in Wisconsin and in Washington, D.C., have failed to implement the bold and effective strategies needed to prevent gun violence. Instead, far too many have continued to cling to the gun lobby’s deadly, greed-driven agenda, creating even greater challenges in preventing gun violence and saving lives. We believe it is our duty to transform these obsolete, yet obstinate, challenges into profound opportunities. Thus, during the next phase of the Wisconsin Gun Violence Prevention Project, we will maximize every opportunity. In particular, we will make certain that all of the citizens, who are appalled at the lack of effort to address gun violence, are invited and inspired to join us and are given the skills needed to engage meaningfully in a broad array of civic actions, from communicating with business and political leaders to participating in the 2020 census to voting in every election. Simultaneously, we will work in solidarity with the many progressive organizations that have come to appreciate the intersection of our goals with their own missions.  More citizens and more organizations joined together in common purpose will create a forceful movement that can promote lifesaving solutions. Over the next year, we will create ambitious and aggressive campaigns addressing all aspects of gun violence. In particular, we will work with our supporters, our organizational partners, and, importantly, our new "next generation" activists to address firearm suicide and all types of interpersonal firearm violence. We will continue to expand our urban violence program as part of our greater efforts of working for racial equity. We will seek changes to non-legislative practices, executive-level actions, and legislative policies, specifically those with a focus on closing under-regulated gun markets and limiting access to guns by high-risk individuals, such as violent misdemeanants and those who pose imminent danger to themselves or others. Finally, with our messages and our actions, we will continue to promote the cultural shifts that both compel and sustain the changes to policy and practices that are necessary to prevent gun violence in our state and our country.  Governor Tony Evers rightly asserts that the will of the people is the law of the land. We intend on being a leading force in the revolution that will ultimately ensure that his words become the new reality in Wisconsin. We know our goals will not be easy to achieve; yet, we have proven over time that, against all odds, we can make great progress in Wisconsin. Our past efforts and successes, coupled with our determination to grow even stronger and more effective, will bring Wisconsin to the forefront of the gun violence prevention movement.

2020 [12]

The Joyce Foundation is committed to improving public policy through its grant program. Accordingly, the Foundation welcomes grant requests from organizations that engage in public policy advocacy. Federal tax law prohibits private foundations from funding lobbying activities. The Foundation may support organizations engaged in public policy by either providing general operating support or by funding educational advocacy such as nonpartisan research, technical assistance, or examinations of broad social issues.

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